Scratch Coat

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Has anyone ever done this?

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Color Coat™ Mixing System Part # Part # (49) options available Color Coat™ is a fade resistant, flexible, permanent coating to restore or change the .
Finish Coat Stucco is designed for use as a decorative finish over Portland ®cement base coats or QUIKRETE. One Coat Fiberglass-Reinforced Stucco (#). Finish Coat Stucco is manufactured as a complete product requiring only the addition of Coat Stucco. Mix thoroughly until uniform in color.
MIX RATIO Combine the components by volume (8:½:4). Mix thoroughly prior to activation. Ful-Base® Basecoat IF Quality Color 8 Do not sand, flame cut, braze or weld dry coating without a NIOSH approved air purifying respirator with particulate filters or appropriate ventilation, and gloves.
Finish Coat Stucco is designed for use as a decorative finish over Portland ®cement base coats or QUIKRETE. One Coat Fiberglass-Reinforced Stucco (#). Finish Coat Stucco is manufactured as a complete product requiring only the addition of Coat Stucco. Mix thoroughly until uniform in color.
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Color Coat™ Mixing System Part # Part # (49) options available Color Coat™ is a fade resistant, flexible, permanent coating to restore or change the .

This brings me to my question. What type of mortar do i use for the scratch coat? The stone that is going to get put up is either an elderado stone or an owins corning profit.

On there site they say to use a "Type N" mortar, but I believe that is the type to use when applying the stone to the scratch coat? Thanks for the help. I use the same mud for both.

Type N would work fine. Originally Posted by bline Thanks for all of the responses. I went to Menards and Lowes yesterday in hopes of finding a type n but nobody had ever even heard of it. Everyone that works at our stores are a bunch of teenage kids though so it was the response I would have guessed i would get. Have any of you bought your type n or s mortar there? Type N is a strength designation, not a type of mortar. Pre-bagged mortar at the big boxes is usually formulated to the Type S specification just to cover their ass because it is usually so crappy.

For your application, it is fine, however. If you want to mix it yourself, the proportion specification for Type N mortar is: All of the Lowes around me sell "mason mix" made by quikrete. Mason mix is a type S mortar. Type S is a bit stronger then N. You might be better off with this because it will be a bit stickier also. Not to mention stronger. I do not do alot of cultured stone work but i have use type M or N always because it was speced in the prints.

Adhered stone manufacturers specify Type N mortar because it has better adhesion characteristics than type S mortar, as a rule. When doing segmental and adhered masonry, the Golden Rule is: Use the weakest compressive strength mortar possible for the application. What makes the adhesion value higher in lower strength mortar? Higher lime to cement ratio?

I tried SikaBond construction adhesive for the first time and didn't like it. The stones are being held on with screws while the crap cures and I'm going back on friday to grout with the premix mortar. I was reading the Owens Corning installation manual and noticed the construction adhesive was an option for interior installations I should've just stuck with the normal way of doing it: P I have no lathe on the plywood that the stones are glued to, and worried about the mortar grout now Has anyone ever done this?

Stupid instruction manuals giving me ideas. I'm too impulsive sometimes. Last edited by Winchester; at My mason bypassed the scratch coat and set the stone in the stucco wire with the colored mortar.

Owens Corning Carolina Ledge in Chardonney. Construction adhesive has a final bond strength much greater than is needed. The problem, as you have found, is that it has no immediate bond strength like mortar does. Construction adhesive is applicable to very few applications. Profit by Cultured Stone and Stacked stone by Eldorado stone are exceptions, although it is not the best solution in any case.

Loneframer, that is an acceptable method of application, if not the best for interior work. It was actually exterior, but in any case they're still on the wall. The only problem with doing it on exterior is the possibility of moisture intrusion through gaps. On exterior it is better to have a solid coat first then wet set the stone. OK i got some specmix and I got the scratch coat done i think. These can not handle rocks though, so using them for concrete is out of the question.

The barrel type mixers can be found at home improvement stores but the selection is pretty limited to non existent, from my experience. I was surprised to find a decent number of these online that were decent quality and a fair price.

Just be sure to try and get a larger one that can handle a good amount of material at once. These can mix up just about any type of stucco mix out there from base coats, to finish coats and even tile grout, concrete and epoxies. It is very versatile and way less money than one of the mixers listed above. A Bucket And Drill: This method is better for smaller applications and uses a 5 gallon bucket and a variable drill with a mixing attachment.

You can use a shovel or a standard hoe, if you would like but is going to be a little bit tougher and take a bit more time. A larger wheelbarrow 6 cu. A Wheelbarrow And Hoe: There are so many different formulas out there that you could use and I will post other ones at the end of this post, but for this example, I am going to use a formula that I have used for years and that works well for me.

For example, if I used a gallon container for measuring, I would fill it with Plastic Cement 1 part , 3 times with masonry sand 3 parts and then add water accordingly. As a test, after the stucco is mixed, take a trowel and dip it into the mix, gathering a baseball-sized amount. Tilt your trowel sideways and if it falls off before reaching a 40 degree angle, then it is probably too wet.

Here is a few different recipes that I pulled up from jlconline. No household-type detergents or chlorides, only those manufactured specifically for use in a stucco mix. Just be sure that you have all the proper tools ahead of time and make a clean and organized work station. No power is needed and for smaller projects, this is a great method. For this example, we will be using a custom mix as described above using 1 part cement 94 lb.

Add a little bit of water to your wheelbarrow roughly 2 gallons to start and throw in one bag of sand. Mix with a hoe and add water if needed. Next, add the bag of cement plastic or Portland cement to the water and sand mix and more water, so you can actually mix everything adequately.

Then, add another bag of sand and more water. Finally, add the last bag of sand and enough water to achieve a thick, but workable consistency. Avoid adding too much water, which can be achieved by adding only enough to be able to mix the sand and cement together, making sure that no dry material is present.

If you have 1 or 2 people mixing, you can really get the material on the wall!

The stucco scratch coat mix is a simple recipe that really consists of sand, cement and water. There are other formulas that you can use but in its simplest form it is merely a 3 to 1 ratio of sand to cement. There is a lot of confusion when it comes to mixing any kind of stucco, but we will be discussing the base coat mix in this article. I will use a custom recipe that will work for most applications and include how to mix in a bucket, wheel barrow and a mixer, which all require a little different techniques. Find great deals on eBay for mix it coat. Shop with confidence.